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Neonatal infections increase the risk of leukemia in childhood

Neonatal infections increase the risk of leukemia in childhood


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Infections in the first year of life increase the chances of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is diagnosed at ages 2-5, suggests research in England.

Infections in the first year of life increase the chances of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is diagnosed at ages 2-5, suggests research in England.
Dr. Eve Roman from York University examined the relationship between the clinical diagnosis of infections in infants and the diagnosis of all children affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia at ages 2-5 in the study of children with cancer in England.
Of 455 children aged 2-5 years diagnosed with leukemia, 425 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
According to a report in the March issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, children diagnosed with ALL had various infections during infants.


Excessive clinical diagnoses of infections in children developing ALL occurred in the first months of life, during the neonatal period. In total, 18% of controls and 24% of ALL patients were diagnosed with at least one infection during the first month of life (chance of survival being 1.4). At the end of the first year of life, 85% of controls and 88% children infected with ALL were reached, the chance of survival decreasing to 1.3.
Children with ALL "who had more than one neonatal infection were diagnosed with ALL at an early age. The age at which most children were diagnosed was 37.7 months - for those who had more than three infections neonatal and 45.3 months for children with one or no infections ".
Dr. Roman concluded that "an early infection may be associated with the early stages of acute lymphoblastic leukemia." Research supports this hypothesis that an abnormal immune response to infections in the first few months of life will lead to the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in childhood.

Tags Neonatal infections